Flatter your figure with Kosibah Creations

So, your man has proposed and you have accepted! Congratulations! Now for all the preparations for your Big Day. . . But where do you start? Keep The Faith spoke with Yemi Osunkoya of Kosibah Creations, who specialises in individually designed wedding gowns that shape and flatter every woman’s figure. . .

One of the first things people think about when mentioning weddings is the bridal gown. For most brides, this is an aspect of their wedding day they have probably given great thought to, sometimes even from childhood.

There are lots of factors that should influence your decision in choosing the perfect bridal gown.  Traditional and religious factors may feature heavily in your choice, for example the requirement to be modest or to wear certain colours.  The venue and size of the wedding may also influence the choice of gown. There will be a huge difference in style choice between a lavish wedding in a stately home, and an intimate wedding in a modern minimalist hotel.

It’s also important your gown should reflect your personality and suit your body type, so try on several dresses – even silhouettes you hadn’t previously considered – to ensure you make the right choice. When shopping for your dress, do not take too many people with you. Restricting your party to perhaps your mother, sister or friend you trust will give you an honest opinion.

There are lots of platforms where you can get ideas and inspiration from, and it’s a good idea to set up a secret Pinterest board to collate all your dress ideas in one place. Instagram is a good resource, as well as wedding blogs.

There are various strong bridal trends for 2016:

Sleeves (from delicate cap sleeves to wrist length) are a strong trend, which is a joy to a lot of brides who want to veer away from the ubiquitous strapless gown, and want some form of coverage on their arms.

Illusion tulle bodices, with lace applique seeming to float on the body. The options for the amount of skin showing are fortunately quite wide, from demure sweetheart necklines to plunging backs and/or cleavage.

Tulle, tulle and even more tulle. Usually featuring on the skirts, either in multiple layers or in a texturised form. A way to add ethereal drama to a dress without overpowering it.

Long trains. The use of tulle on the skirts lends itself to this train. A gown can have a dramatically long cathedral tulle train and still be light, whimsical and easy to manoeuvre around in.

Pastel shades. Pantone’s colour of the year, Rose Quartz, or mushroom, blush and latte are beautiful muted shades that, layered on or over the traditional ivory, just adds something special to a wedding gown.

Sheath ball gown skirt. This is where, from the front, the skirt is narrow and fitted, either straight to the hem or with a slight flare/trumpet silhouette and, attached to the sides and back, is the traditional full ball gown skirt, seemingly acting as a frame for the sheath skirt. Perfect for so many body types, especially pear-shaped brides.

The bridal gown will always remain the focal point of weddings and, therefore, every bride should think very carefully when choosing this iconic garment that she will wear just once in her lifetime.

If you are looking for some guidance, or perhaps you have a very definite idea of what you want, why not get in touch with Yemi to discuss your requirements? The initial consultation is free of charge and without obligation!

For more information, visit www.kosibah.co.uk, telephone: 020 7424 8832 or email: designer@kosibah.co.uk
IG:www.instagram.com/yemikosibah

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