BB annual conference led by young people

Young people from The Boys’ Brigade undertook leading roles for the organisation’s Scottish Conference in Bankfoot, Perthshire.

 

The volunteers, aged 18-25, from across Scotland took to the stage on Saturday (5 Mar) to host the conference in front of over 100 BB leaders.  There was a focus on new programme ideas and the continuing growth of the organisation, which was founded in 1883.

 

Barbara Heeps, Captain of 1st Bankfoot Company, said:

 

“It is terrific to have welcomed The BB’s Scottish conference to Bankfoot.  Bringing together BB leaders from every corner of Scotland offered a great sense of encouragement and fellowship.

 

“The Boys’ Brigade has come a long way since it was established and young people are very much encouraged to have a voice.

 

As part of the conference, a call was made to increase the number of BB captains currently in post.  Captains are responsible for the leadership of each BB group and oversee what happens at local level.

 

Bill Stevenson, Director of The Boys’ Brigade, Scotland, said:

 

“Events like this offer an opportunity to celebrate our successes and a chance to reflect on the role our members and volunteers play in the organisation and to their local communities.

 

“Since The Boys’ Brigade’s inception, much has changed as we’ve continued to evolve keeping the organisation relevant to our nearly 20,000 members in the country. We hope that over the coming session, we can support more BB volunteers to take on leading roles, such as the position of Captain.”

 

 

Bill added:

 

“The young leaders did a fantastic job at The Scottish Conference and this was a perfect example of young people taking the lead. Not only does it help increase confidence but it stresses the importance of giving our young leaders responsibility and opportunities to develop.”

 

The Boys’ Brigade was founded by William Alexander Smith in Glasgow on 4th October 1883 and quickly spread across the United Kingdom before becoming a worldwide organisation by the early 1890s.

 

Natalie Davidson

 

 

 

 

 

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