New resource to equip churches to help tackle low UK childhood happiness and wellbeing

As concerns mount over the wellbeing of UK youth in the wake of the pandemic and lockdown, recent research from WHO reveals the country consistently scored poorly in international league tables on childhood happiness and wellbeing before the coronavirus hit. The Ugly Duckling Company (UDC) is developing 10:10, a new and innovative resource designed to help equip the church to enable young people to explore important principles that increase their resilience and better develop their mental, emotional and physical wellbeing.

Other research released this month from the University of Bath has revealed that children and teenagers are more likely to experience high rates of depression and anxiety due to lockdown, with the report calling for preventative support and early intervention where possible. The 10:10 course by UDC, due to launch later this year, has been created for young people aged 11 to 17 to help equip them as they explore how to build a happier life. It will be available to use in churches – as well as schools, youth clubs and community groups – and is being supported by a £60,000 grant over two years from Allchurches Trust.

The key themes are built on the foundations of positive psychology and spirituality, exploring ideas like purpose; thankfulness; kindness; forgiveness; healthy relationships, coping strategies and how to look after the mind, body and soul.  The 10 sessions will feature a series of films, expert content, group discussions, creative exercises, experiments and additional downloadable resources.

Director of the Ugly Duckling Company, Sharon Lanfear, says,

“The aim at the end of the course is for young people to be able to apply all they have discovered, be equipped to flourish and pursue a good and meaningful life.  Without this funding support from Allchurches Trust, the 10:10 resource may not have been possible, and we’re delighted that they have shown faith in the project, recognising its potential in building confidence and resilience in young people, and having a positive, long-term impact on their wellbeing.”

The course will also enable youth workers, chaplains and teachers to create a meaningful and helpful space that allows participants to discover and experiment with ideas that can enable them to develop a happier and full life.

Grants Officer from Allchurches Trust, Paul Playford adds,

“10:10 will be a unique resource for teachers, youth workers and churches as they seek to support young people through the very real challenges that they are struggling with through the coronavirus pandemic, but also with other situations they may be facing.

He continues,

“The benefits that spirituality can bring to wellbeing are often underestimated and through this resource, young people will be supported to explore their spirituality, grow their self-worth and given the tools to support their wellbeing and be kind to themselves and others.”

Martin Saunders, Director of Innovation and Deputy CEO at the charity YouthScape, who has written numerous youth work resources says,

“It is absolutely vital, perhaps more now than ever, that we invest in the emotional well-being of our children and young people. I have no doubt that this resource will enable schools, churches, youth leaders and parents to help young people to stay healthy and happy, and better understand themselves.”

Revd Canon Dave Male, Director of Evangelism and Discipleship for the Church of England added,

“This is another great resource from UDC to help churches connect with young people to help them discover what a flourishing life really is. This kind of resource is hugely important at this time and I commend it to all church leaders”.

For schools, churches, youth clubs and community groups looking to find out more about the 10:10 course please contact: youth@theuglyducklingcompany.com or visit the website: www.theuglyducklingcompany.com.

Allchurches Trust is one of the UK’s largest grant-making charities and gave £17.8 million to churches, charities and communities in 2019. Its funds come from its ownership of Ecclesiastical Insurance Group.

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