New Partnership Crosses Borders to Support Survivors of Modern Slavery And Their Families

To mark the International Day of Prayer and Awareness Against Human Trafficking, on 8th February,  two organisations working together to support survivors of modern slavery, The Salvation Army and Medaille Trust, are celebrating a new partnership to provide end to end support to survivors and their family members through global networks. 

The Salvation Army welcomes Medaille Trust to its Beyond Programme which was established in recognition that international support systems for survivors of modern slavery are underfunded, constantly changing and highly varied. Deploying its existing international network, working  in 134 countries across the globe, The Salvation Army’s Beyond Programme supports survivors wishing to return to their home country to reintegrate safely and with support. It also provides support to their family members when separated by borders.  

Medaille Trust is one of the largest Catholic charities confronting modern slavery. CEO Garry Smith said:

We are delighted to be participating in The Salvation Army’s Beyond programme. Confronting the global crime of people trafficking requires better international collaboration, particularly in supporting survivors who wish to return and reintegrate into their home countries. We have already seen the benefit of this partnership supporting a survivor to go home and begin the process of rebuilding their life and we are excited to see what could be possible in the future.

The Beyond Programme already operates with colleagues from The Salvation Army’s specialist support services in England and Wales. Through a government contract they help adult survivors of modern slavery with their recovery. Other partner organisations include Causeway and most recently Hestia who, like Medaille Trust, work with The Salvation Army on this contract.

Since February 2023 the Beyond programme has:

  • received referrals from more than 30 different nationalities;
  • worked  with more than 50 different organisations across the world
  • supported more than 80 survivors needing help for their own recovery and reintegration or support for families members from whom they are separated.

Medaille Trust worked with The Salvation Army to help one survivor of modern slavery in the UK fulfil her wish to return to her home country. Her specialist support worker from Medaille Trust said:

I am very thankful to The Salvation Army’s Beyond Programme who made it possible for her to return to her home country. She had been wanting to go back home ever since she was first trafficked to the UK but has unfortunately not had any safe place to go. It was so great to be able to work together with the Beyond Programme to support her to have a safe house to live in her own country who also offer her support in her own culture and language to move forward positively with her life there. I saw a huge difference in her mental health and wellbeing once she knew she could go home and still be safe and receive support.

The Salvation Army relies on the generosity of supporters to meet the needs of as many survivors as possible. Donations to its Anti Trafficking and Modern Slavery Fund enable its teams to continue this vital work can be made here.

Director of Anti Trafficking and Modern Slavery for The Salvation Army, Kathy Betteridge said:

It is vital to have end to end help for survivors who want to return home safely and with everything in place to build a successful future. We are privileged to be on the frontline working directly with survivors and witnessing first-hand the impact this kind of support can have on transforming lives. We cannot do this alone and so it is wonderful to be working with partners like Medaille, Causeway and Hestia and to receive support from the public to help us meet the needs of many more people. We would also encourage people to join us in prayer not only for survivors and the staff and volunteers who work with them but also for a change in heart for the traffickers who trick trap and trade in the lives of vulnerable people.

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